No Justice In Daughter's Death
After 23 Years, Grand Jury Investigates
By Jacqueline Adams, CBS News Correspondent
November 02, 1998

"There's something deeply
wrong when a rich and
powerful family can hold the
police at bay for as many
years as the Skakels have
held the police at bay."

-- Writer Dominick Dunne

(CBS) It was 23 years ago this weekend that Martha Moxley was killed. The 15-year-old was savagely beaten and stabbed to death with the shaft of a golf club in a wealthy enclave of Greenwich, Connecticut. More than two decades later the girl's mother, Dorthy, is still seeking justice for her daughter's death, CBS News Correspondent Jacqueline Adams reports.

The chief suspects in the crime, first Tommy and now Michael Skakel, are nephews of Senator Robert and Ethel Kennedy. The boys lived next door to Martha.

"The golf club came from their house, and they haven't cooperated," Dorthy Moxley says. "Had they cooperated, we would have been able to look other places."

After more than two decades, a special grand jury of one has finally begun probing the murder, so far calling more than 30 witnesses. But, as he has apparently done for many years, the Skakel patriarch, Rushton, is fighting every effort to have him or his sons tell police and prosecutors what they know.

"There's something deeply wrong when a rich and powerful family can hold the police at bay for as many years as the Skakels have held the police at bay," says writer Dominick Dunne, who thinly disguised the Moxley murder in a novel and popular television mini-series.

The publicity from Dunne's book prompted a source to hand the writer a bombshell. It was a private investigator's report, ordered by Rushton Skakel. Instead of clearing his sons, the findings reportedly were damning.

"The conclusion is that it was not Tommy Skakel, who has always been the main suspect in the killing of Martha Moxley, but it was Michael Skakel," Dunne says. "Tommy Skakel probably helped move the body."

The attorney for Michael Skakel says his client has consistently denied any involvement in the murder. So far, prosecutors have not subpoenaed either of the Skakel brothers.

Still, Dorthy Moxley is hopeful. "Martha is not coming back, and so to rush it now, there's no reason," she says.

For her, justice is far closer on this anniversary than it has ever been.

Copyright 1998, CBS Worldwide Inc., All Rights Reserved